The Meatwave: Barbecue & Grilling Recipes, Reviews, Tips, and Tricks

Tue Mar 1, 2016

Patatesli Pide

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Patatesli Pide

As much as I love my KettlePizza, it does take about an hour to get it fully fired up and ready to cook with, then extra time to dissemble and put away. That added time and maintenance translates to me not using it nearly as much as I'd like to. When I do get it going, I try to make the best use of that blazing hot fire as possible. So when I decided to try my hand in making pides—Turkish stuffed flatbreads—I went for broke and did three distinct recipes. The original inspiration was a minced lamb pide that turned out incredible, but my second variation, a spiced potato or patatesli pide, turned out equally great.

Patatesli Pide

I've had patatesli pides before, and could never quite put my finger on exactly what made them so different and tasty. When it came time to devise a recipe myself, it didn't take more than a simple search to find the answer though—aci biber salcasi, Turkish hot pepper paste. This paste is made from sun-dried red hot chili peppers that are then ground together. I worried I wouldn't be able to find it in my hometown of Durham, but lo and behold, I saw it sitting my local Asian mega-mart, resting next to the sambals and srirachas that are more expected in that venue.

Patatesli Pide

The pepper paste does a lot of the heavy lifting in giving the mashed potatoes their semi-spiciness and orange color, but I put together a seasoning mixture that I hoped would further deepen the flavor and more closely match the patatesli pides I've encountered previously. This had me adding tomato paste for both color and acidity, cumin for earthiness, and urfa pepper flakes for an additional pepper layer that was a little sweet and smoky.

Patatesli Pide

Procuring the ingredients was the hardest part of making this filling, the actually cooking was familiar from making other mashed potato connotations in the past. It started with covering a pound of peeled and chunked russet potatoes with cold water, then bringing the water to a boil over medium-high heat. I then let the potatoes simmer until they could be easily pierced with a paring knife—about 15 minutes—before draining them and setting them aside.

Patatesli Pide

Next I melted butter in my now empty dutch oven and sautéed a finely chopped onion until it was softened, but not browned. Then I added in my seasoning mixture and let it cook until it was fragrant.

Patatesli Pide

I added the potatoes back in and started mashing. I only lightly mashed them, working them enough that they were mostly broken down, but still had a few larger potato bits in there, trying to mimic the texture I've come across in patatesli pides.

Patatesli Pide

Finally I stirred in fresh parsley and seasoned the mixture with salt and pepper to taste. When I was done, I was pretty damn happy with this filling—it had both the unique pepper flavor and semi-chunky texture I was after.

Patatesli Pide

Now it was time to turn that great creation into an even tastier pide. To do this, I rolled out one ball of dough—I covered the details of making the dough in a previous pide post—into a long oval and spread a generous amount of the filling along the center.

Patatesli Pide

I left the edges clear so I could fold them over and pinch the ends together to make the ubiquitous pide formation. With the pide ready for the oven, I transfer it to a pizza peel and slide it into my PizzaKettle running at around 950°F.

Turkish Lamb Pide

It cooked up in almost no time—about three minutes total. That was even faster than I was expecting, which led to my burning part of the crust at the bottom, but no worries, I think a little char on a crust is a good thing.

Patatesli Pide

The final pide was almost exactly what I going for. The crust was nice and crisp with just a little chew to it, and the filling was pretty spot on—it had a great earthy heat that was distinctly Turkish. The potatoes were an excellent delivery method for this layered spice, one that was so good that my guests actually started eating the potatoes on their own. Still, I recommend putting them in pide form, which made it totally worthwhile to get that KettlePizza going.

Patatesli Pide

Patatesli pides match a uniquely earthy and mildly spicy potato filling with a crispy and slightly chewy dough to make an excellent meal.
  • Prep Time:
  • 1 Hour 15 Minutes
  • Inactive Time:
  • 2 Hours
  • Cook Time:
  • 5 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 3 Hours 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 4 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Dough
  • 20 ounces (about 4 cups) all-purpose flour
  • .5 ounce (about 3 teaspoons) instant yeast
  • .35 ounces (about 1 tablespoon) kosher salt
  • .15 ounces (about 1 teaspoon) sugar
  • 12 ounce lukewarm water
  • 1.125 ounces (about 3 tablespoons) Extra Virgin olive oil
  •  
  • For the Filling
  • 1lb russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped yellow onion
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Turkish hot red pepper paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon Urfa pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley, divided
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Procedure

  1. To make the dough: In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk together flour, yeast, salt, and sugar. Add in water and oil and mix on low speed with paddle attachment until combined. Switch to dough hook and knead on medium speed until dough clears sides, but sticks to the bottom of the bowl, 5 to 7 minutes. Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and divide into 4 equal pieces. Transfer to a parchment paper lined baking sheet, brush lightly with olive oil, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise at room temperature for 2 hours or in the refrigerator for 1-3 days.
  2. To make the filling: Place potatoes in a large pot or dutch oven and add in enough cold water to completely cover potatoes. Bring water to a boil over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon kosher salt, reduce heat to a simmer. Cook potatoes until a paring knife can be slide into center of potato with no resistance, 15-20 minutes. Strain potatoes and set aside.
  3. Melt butter in now empty pot over medium heat. When foaming subsides, add in onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions have softened, but not browned, about 7 minutes. Stir in tomato paste, pepper paste, pepper flakes, and cumin; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove from heat, add in potatoes and mash with potato masher. Add in 2 tablespoons of parsley and stir mixture together until the potatoes are an even orange color throughout. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. To make the pides: If dough is refrigerated, 2 hours prior to cooking, remove dough from refrigerator and allow to rest at room temperature, covered, for at least 2 hours before baking. Heat KettlePizza or pizza oven to 950°F. Alternatively, set a baking stone or Baking Steel on upper middle rack in oven and heat on highest setting possible for 45 minutes. Roll dough out into a long oval. Spread potato mixture along middle of dough, leaving a 1-inch edge with no filling. Fold sides of dough over filling and pinch ends closed.
  5. Place pide in pizza oven and cook for 2-3 minutes, rotating pizza for even cooking as necessary. Alternatively, place pide on baking stone or steel in heated oven and cook until crust is baked through, 7-10 minutes. Remove from oven, garnish with remaining parsley, slice, and serve immediately. Repeat with remaining dough and filling.

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